use of protein-rich foods for the relief of malnutrition in developing countries
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use of protein-rich foods for the relief of malnutrition in developing countries an analysis of experience. by Elizabeth Orr

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Published by Tropical Products Institute in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsTropical Products Institute.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13716721M

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  MALNUTRITION, WITH ITS 2 CONSTITUENTS of protein–energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, continues to be a major health burden in developing countries. It is globally the most important risk factor for illness and death, with hundreds of millions of pregnant women and young children particularly affected. Apart from marasmus and Cited by: This paper reviews the position of the weaning foods which have been developed since the s in tropical countries. Well-known brand names include Incaparina (Guatemala), Faffa (Ethiopia), and Indian Multipurpose food. Most of these foods were developed on the assumption that weaning children in the countries concerned were poorly fed in comparison with the rest Cited by: 8. Orr E: The Use of Protein-rich Foods for the Relief of Malnutrition in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Experience. Tropical Products Institute, Aug Google ScholarAuthor: James E. Austin. And for millions of children, chronic malnutrition will result in stunting – an irreversible condition that literally stunts their physical and mental growth. Younas of Pakistan holds a packet of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food, a protein-rich "miracle" treatment for severe acute malnutrition.

  In developed countries, elderly people who are aged 65 years and above normally live within care facilities and such situation put them at a risk of becoming malnutrition. In such places, the elderly face long term diseases which affect their ability of absorption and even their appetite hence complexity in feeding themselves.   Malnutrition remains prevalent in under fives in resource-poor countries. In , 51 million children had at least moderate wasting (global prevalence of almost 8%) and 17 million were severely wasted (global prevalence almost 3%) with the highest prevalence in Asia (71%) and Africa (28%). New chapters in the book's final section contain special topics relating to humanitarian emergencies, including a case study of the Indian Ocean tsunami in , food in humanitarian relief, food policy, the emerging role of supermarkets in developing countries, homestead food production, aging, ethics, and the adverse impact of parental. Enriching lives: overcoming vitamin and mineral malnutrition in developing countries (English) Abstract. Unlike most treatises on the subject of micronutrient malnutrition, this volume is not an exhaustive description of the size of the problem or its causes.

This updated and expanded book was written with the underlying conviction that global health and nutrition problems can only be solved through a firm the role of food in humanitarian relief / Patrick Webb and Andrew Thorne-Lyman # Malnutrition--Developing countries\/span> \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0 schema:bookEdition\/a> \" 2nd ed. “The Use of Protein-rich Foods for the Relief of Malnutrition in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Experience,” Tropical Products Institute Monograph G73, Aug. 8. Orr, E., Food Nutr. 3(2):2 (). Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) One of the solutions to malnutrition is Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTFs), which have been developed in the form of peanut-butter based pastes and biscuits that are nutrient-rich and packed with high concentrations of protein and energy. RUTFs reduce exposure to water-borne bacteria as they contain no. E. Orr, The Use of Protein Rich Foods for the Relief of Malnutrition in Developing Countries: An Analysis of Experience (Report of the Tropical Products Institute No. G73, Tropical Products Institute, Grays Inn Road, London, W.C. I., England, ).